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A United Methodist Certified Lay Minister is a certified lay servant who is called and equipped to conduct public worship, care for the congregation, assist in program leadership, develop new and existing faith communities, preach the Word, lead small groups, or establish community ministries as part of a ministry team with the supervision and support of a clergy person. A certified lay minister is assigned by a district superintendent.

What is a Certified Lay Minister?

2016 BOD, ¶ 268. Certified Lay Minister—1. A certified lay minister is a certified lay servant, certified lay missioner, (or equivalent as defined by his or her central conference), who is called and equipped to conduct public worship, care for the congregation, assist in program leadership,develop new and existing faith communities, preach the Word, lead small groups, or establish community outreach ministries as part of a ministry team with the supervision and support of salesperson. A certified lay minister is assigned by a district superintendent in accordance with ¶419.2.

2. The certified lay minister serves to enhance the quality of ministry much like a class leader did in early Methodism through service in the local church, circuit or cooperative parish,or by expanding team ministry in other churches and charges. As with lay ministry in early Methodism, the certified lay minister uses his or her spiritual gifts as evidence of God’s grace.

3. One may be recognized by the conference committee on lay servant ministries, or equivalent structure, as a certified lay minister after he or she has:

a) Been certified as a lay servant, lay missioner, or equivalent as defined by his or her central conference;

b) Obtained written recommendation from the pastor and the church council or charge conference of the local church in which he or she holds membership;

c) Completed a track of study for certified lay ministers relevant to the candidate's assignment as defined by the General Board of Discipleship, or the National Plan for Hispanic/Latino Ministry in collaboration with the General Board of Discipleship, and the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries or equivalent structure;

d) Received a letter of recommendation from his/her district superintendent;

e) Had all requirements for certification, including appropriate screening and assessment as defined by the annual conference, reviewed by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, for referral to the district committee on ordained ministry for examination of persons who have applied in writing to be certified lay ministers and to make recommendation for certification (see ¶666.10). After the district committee on ordained ministry interviews the candidate, the district committee on ordained ministry will make a recommendation to the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries for final certification by that committee.

4. Recognition as a certified lay minister may be renewed every two years by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, after the certified lay minister has:

a) Submitted an annual report to the charge conference or church council where membership is held and to the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, giving evidence of satisfactory performance as a certified lay minister.

b) Obtained a ministry review by the committee on pastor-parish relations, church council, or charge conference from the congregation of which he or she is a member, or when under assignment, from the committee on pastor-parish relations, charge conference,or supervisory board of the ministry setting in which he or she is assigned.

c) Completed a Lay Servant Ministries advanced course or approved continuing education event, as defined by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries or equivalent structure in the last two years.

d) Obtained recommendation for re-certification from the district superintendent.

e) Had all requirements for re-certification reviewed by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, for referral to the district committee on ordained ministry for examination of persons who have applied in writing to be renewed as certified lay ministers and to make recommendation for re-certification (see ¶666.10). After the district committee on ordained ministry interviews the certified lay minister, the district committee on ordained ministry will make a recommendation to the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries for final re-certification by that committee.

5. A certified lay minister may transfer certification to another district or conference upon receipt of a letter from the previous conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, confirming current certification and the completion date of the most recent advanced course taken. Further renewal is in accordance with 268.4.

6. A certified lay minister is not eligible for support by equitable compensation funds or pension funds that are provided for clergy. If a certified lay minister is a lay staff member of a church, circuit or cooperative parish, the local congregation is encouraged to provide compensation and withhold taxes appropriate to a layperson.

Certified Lay Ministry Process

Below is the step process in becoming a certified and re-certified lay minister in the UMC TN Conference.

Certification

1.  Must be Certified as a Lay Servant Minister. To become certified as a Lay Servant Minister you need to have the Basic Lay Servant Ministry Class and 1 Advanced Class (contact district lay servant ministry person for your district for info and see www.beadisciple.com for online opportunities)

2. Pastor and church council OR charge conference letter of recommendation

3.  District Superintendent letter of recommendation

4.  Completion of a track of study – The CLM Academy Modules I, II, III, and IV (contact the Turner Center at Martin Methodist for more info and see www.beadisciple.com/certified-lay-ministry for online opportunities)

5.  Have a background check (download consent form and return to Shana Hibdon at the Turner Center via email or mail)

6.  Recommendation (after interview) from District Committee on Ordained Ministry (dCOM)

7.   Recommendation (after interview) from Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries

Additional Requirements for the Tennessee Conference

8.   Sign a “notarized statement” detailing with any former criminal or sexual misconduct (download the form, fill out form, have it notarized, and return to Shana Hibdon at the Turner Center via email or mail)

9.  Sign A GBHEM work authorization form (download the form, fill out form, have it notarized, and return to Shana Hibdon at the Turner Center via email or mail)

10. Inclusiveness Training (taught by TN Conference Office of Connectional Ministries, phone: 615-329-1177)

11.  Safe Sanctuaries Training (taught by TN Conference Office of Connectional Ministries, phone: 615-329-1177)

12. Healthy Boundaries (taught by TN Conference Office of Connectional Ministries, phone: 615-329-1177)

Re-certification

Recognition as a certified lay minister may be renewed every two years by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries after the certified lay minister has:

a)  Submitted an annual report to the charge conference or church council where membership is held and to the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, giving evidence of satisfactory performance as a certified lay minister.

b)  Obtained a ministry review by the committee on pastor-parish relations, church council, or charge conference from the congregation of which he or she is a member, or when under assignment, from the committee on pastor-parish relations, charge conference, or supervisory board of the ministry setting in which he or she is assigned.

c)  Completed a Lay Servant Ministries advanced course or approved continuing education event, as defined by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries or equivalent structure in the last two years.

d)  Obtained recommendation for re-certification from the district superintendent.

e)  Had all requirements for re-certification reviewed by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, for referral to the district committee on ordained ministry for examination of persons who have applied in writing to be renewed as certified lay ministers and to make recommendation for re-certification (see ¶666.10).

After the district committee on ordained ministry interviews the certified lay minister, the district committee on ordained ministry will make a recommendation to the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries for final re-certification by that committee.

A certified lay minister may transfer certification to another district or conference upon receipt of a letter from the previous conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, confirming current certification and the completion date of the most recent advanced course taken. Further renewal is in accordance with 268.4.

A certified lay minister is not eligible for support by equitable compensation funds or pension funds that are provided for clergy. If a certified lay minister is a lay staff member of a church, circuit or cooperative parish, the local congregation is encouraged to provide compensation and withhold taxes appropriate to a layperson.



**It is the responsibility of the CLM to make sure ALL required certificates of completion, letters, and forms are sent to the CLM Registrar at the Turner Center at Martin Methodist.  Failure to do so will delay CLM certification and recognition.

HELPFUL INFORMATION

1. Steps to becoming a certified and re-certified CLM in the TN Conference >>DOWNLOAD

2.   CLM Guidelines>>DOWNLOAD

CLM Forms

1.   Background Check Consent Form  >>DOWNLOAD

2.   "Notarized Statement Form detailing with any former criminal or sexual misconduct  >>DOWNLOAD

3.   
GBHEM work authorization form   >>DOWNLOAD

3.   
CLM Annual Report to the Charge Conference>>DOWNLOAD

District Superintendent and DCOM Forms

1.  Suggested Guidelines for DCOM - CLM Interviews >>DOWNLOAD

2.   District Superintendent and DCOM Recommendation for Certification Form>>DOWNLOAD

3.   District Superintendent and DCOM Recommendation for Re-Certification From >>DOWNLOAD

Certified Lay Minister Supervision

The 2016 Book of Discipline, ¶ 205.4, says that “When a pastoral charge is not able to be served by an ordained or licensed minister, the bishop, upon recommendation of the cabinet, may assign a qualified and trained layperson, lay minister or lay missioner to do the work of ministry in that charge. The layperson is accountable to the district superintendent or another ordained or licensed minister appointed to oversee the charge, who will make provision for sacramental ministry. Upon the bishop's assignment, the layperson will be assigned an additional clergy person as a guide to provide support in the assignment." The supervising clergy person/mentor, therefore, is responsible for:

*  Overseeing the pastoral charge in which CLM serves

*  Equipping for ministry — Participates in training and/or development of CLM or other assigned e.g. lay missioner

*  Providing sacramental ministry in the pastoral charge

*  Providing support in the assignment through relational partnering

Role of the CLM Supervising Clergy person/Mentor

*  Participates in forming the covenant for ministry within the congregation with CLM and mutual ministry team

*  Ensures a collaborative relationship with D.S. for mission and ministry through the CLM and mutual ministry team

*  Helps to ensure that the CLM can function in his/her responsibility

*  Helps to develop and shape CLM for mission and ministry in a formative relational process‍

Duties of CLM Supervising Clergy person/Mentor

*  Meet regularly with CLM and document meeting — more than a cup of coffee

*  Be a resource for problem solving

*  Participate in the Mutual Ministry Team

*  Respect the call of the CLM as a lay person (not on track for ordination)

*  Oversee the charge

*  Provide for sacramental ministry

*  Provide guidance and support as the CLM develops the knowledge and skills for ministry

The work of the supervising clergy person/mentor begins with the gathering of the Mutual Ministry Team for the purpose of:

1. Understanding the nature of ministry in The United Methodist Church

2. Identifying the need for ministry in a faith community and the gifts that God has given for meeting those needs, and

3. Developing a covenant for ministry that will respond to the ministry needs of a specific setting

The experience the supervising clergy person/mentor brings to these tasks will add depth to the understanding of the team and contribute to the analysis of need. The work of this clergy member of the team is critical to the development of a covenant for ministry and to the effectiveness of service that follows.

If participation in the process of building a covenant for ministry is the first task, this is followed by carrying out a carefully defined role in providing sacraments, mentoring the CLM, and assuming other roles and responsibilities as needed. While serving as a CLM mentor, the clergy member is expected to exercise wisdom in helping create a safe place for reflection and growth. CLM mentors should have the maturity of faith and the skills for helping shape a relationship in which reflection about call and the development of knowledge and skills for the fulfillment of vocation can take place.

Trust is one of the fundamental building blocks of a successful mentoring relationship. A key factor in its development is a shared understanding of the degree to which communication between the mentor and the CLM is considered confidential, both by the individuals themselves and by the structures of the annual conference. Both the CLM and the mentor should be aware of the stated expectations and standards of the conference in regard to communication between the CLM and the mentor.

Mentoring is a supportive relationship in which the clergy member of the Mutual Ministry Team guides the CLM in theological reflection. Any everyday event can become the basis for conversation about"who I am, my roles, and my words and actions." The mentoring process is very different from relationships in which events become the agenda for judging clergy or for seeking solutions to problems.While the Mutual Ministry Team and the supervising clergy person/mentor assigned to the team may at times do problem solving, the primary role of a mentor is to help the CLM reflect about his or her authority, call, and the various roles the ministerial vocation requires.

When the supervising clergy person of the team and the CLM meet in a mentoring relationship, they are sharing in sacred time. These sessions should be planned carefully and approached prayerfully.Remember that, in addition to the usual greetings and conversation, the purpose of the session is to engage in theological reflection upon a specific topic. The mentor is not the judge and jury. Instead, the mentor invites the CLM to engage in a "holy conference" on a topic, theme, or issue.

At times issues raised by the CLM will guide the conversation. At other times the mentor may suggest the discussion of important issues. In either case it is important to explore a variety of dimensions of the issue. There are usually more issues than there is time to discuss; therefore, defining at the beginning of the time together the major issue to be discussed will help keep the conversation on track.

Both the mentor and the CLM should keep in mind that the primary focus of the meeting is their roles,authority, and relationships in meeting the pastoral needs of the faith community in which they are serving. This is neither a therapy session nor a nuts and bolts, problem-solving session. The mentor is neither exploring the psychological dynamics of the persons involved nor giving "expert" advice about how to fix a problem. Instead, the mentor assists the CLM in clarifying issues and options, helping the CLM to think about what it means to be in ministry. The discussion is not complete until there is theological reflection.

SUGGESTED TOPICS

Ministry Event
A ministry event might be a conversation, phone call, meeting, worship service, or experience in prayer.Any part of an event — past or anticipated — in the life of the CLM may provide the basis for theological reflection. A ministry event can be shared in a variety of ways, including stream of consciousness,verbatim, or role playing. The purpose is to discover information that will help both persons to understand what happened in the ministry event. Questions such as the following may help to elicit the information:

*  As CLM, what are the issues you see for yourself in this ministry event?

*  As mentor, what are the issues you see for the CLM?

Life Event
A life event is a personal experience outside of the CLM ministry role, i.e., family issue, health concern,etc.

Shared Experience
This may include times of joint participation in a variety of settings, i.e., a retreat, continuing education event, book study, movie, etc.

REFLECTION PROCESS

Step One (for the CLM):

*  Describe an event (ministry, life, or shared experience) that you want to share with your mentor in order to gain deeper theological understanding, insight, and wisdom.

*  Write or type your description on the left-hand side of the sheet(s) of paper, allowing space for your mentor to respond with comments. You may choose one of two approaches:

*  narrative, free-flowing "stream-of-consciousness" style
*  "verbatim" style

Step Two (for the CLM and the mentor): Reflect on the event using one of the following models.

MODEL 1

The reflective questions in this model are based on events and relationships in Jesus’s ministry.These questions should serve as aids in the reflection process and should not be used as a way to "test" the CLM. (This model was prepared by the Rev. Sylvia Russell of the Ministry Preparation Resource Team, and is used by permission.)

Loving Others Based on the Model of Jesus

*  What are the needs, as you understand them, of each person and/or group in the situation?

*  How well did you listen to what was being communicated both verbally and nonverbally?

*  In what way(s) did your response in the event reflect the way Jesus loved others?

*  In light of the way Jesus loved others, are there other ways in which you might have responded in love to the others in this event?

*  What did you learn about yourself and about loving others from this event?

Loving Self Based on the Model of Jesus

*  Describe the emotions you experienced during this event.

*  Did your response to this event relate to a predominant theme in your life?

*  What need in your life were you hoping this event would meet? Was this need met?

*  How did you take care of yourself through this event?

*  What did you learn about loving yourself from this event?

Love Based on the Model of Jesus, in the Context of this Situation

*  What part did culture, gender, race, sexuality, and economics play in this event?

*  How were the dynamics of power and authority expressed in this event?

*  Were money issues involved in the event? If so, name them.

*  Name justice issues that were important in this event.

*  What did you learn about yourself and about love in the context of this situation?

Reflections to Share During the Mentoring Time

*  In what way(s) did you act out Jesus' love towards one another during this time together?

*  Share affirmations and statements of gratitude.

*  Complete the statement: "Today I learned _______________."

*  Complete the statements: "I feel ______________________. I still need you to_____________________________."

*  In what ways did the persons involved make use of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason?

*  How did this experience relate to your call, vocation, spiritual discipline, and authority?

MODEL 2

The format and content of the four perspectives below are taken from material developed bythe Intern Program of Perkins School of Theology, and are used by permission. Reflect on yourevent using the perspectives listed below in the order in which they appear. These questions areintended to serve as aids in the reflection process and should not be used as a way to "test" theCLM.

Pastoral Questions for Reflection

*  How well did you identify and respond to the needs of the person(s) involved in the event?

*  Were you able to listen and hear what they were saying to you both verbally and nonverbally?

*  In what ways were you helpful?

*  Can you explain why you did what you did?

*  What did you learn from the event about your own pastoral identity and authority?

Personal Questions for Reflection

*  How and why was this event significant for your personally?

*  How did you find yourself reacting on rational and emotional levels?

*  Did you find the event boring? exciting? frustrating?

*  What did you learn about yourself during the event?

Social Questions for Reflection

*  How did your identity (culture, gender, race, ethnicity, class) affect this event?

*  What cultural issues emerged during the event?

*  What gender and/or racial-ethnic issues were involved?

*  What class or economic issues were involved?

*  What were the power dynamics in this event?

*  How aware were you of the emerging social context of the event?

*  What role did your own social location play in your behavior?

*  What social institutions or agencies were implicated in this event?

Social Questions for Reflection

*  What faith issues were involved in the event, both for you and for the other persons(s)?

*  In what ways did you witness to your understanding of the gospel in the event?

*  What use did you make of scripture, the tradition of the church, your own experience and that of others in the Christian tradition, and your powers of reason?

*  How was God revealed in this event, both for you and for the other person(s) involved?

*  How does this ministry relate to your theological understanding of ministry as expressed in your learning covenant?

*  In what ways is/was God's presence and activity evident in this event?

Step Three:
The CLM provides the mentor with a copy of the reflection at least one week prior to their next meeting.

Step Four:
The mentor reads the reflection and makes notes on the right-hand side of the paper.

Step Five:
In the meeting, the mentor and CLM review the reflection together. Then, the CLM listens as the mentor responds. The CLM writes the mentor's comments on his or her copy.

Step Six:
In ongoing dialogue, the mentor facilitates deeper reflection on the part of the CLM, focusing on the theological perspective.Closing Sacred Time Before ending the time together as CLM and mentor, share with each other how you have experienced the session. Quality time together includes:

*  Affirming each other

*  Acknowledging unfinished business,

*  Confirming the schedule for the next meeting, and

*  Praying for each other.





Certified Lay Minister Support

How do Certified Lay Ministers Work with a Ministry Team?

A Certified Lay Minister (CLM) is not ordained or licensed clergy under appointment of the bishop. A CLM is a lay person certified for intentional leadership and assigned by the district superintendent to a congregation or ministry. He or she does not replace clergy — but rather, works with clergy so that the congregation has the leadership necessary for vital mission and ministry. Unlike other forms of leadership, a CLM must be part of a ministry team.

Forming the Ministry Team

A CLM serves as part of a ministry team that should include the district superintendent and/or supervising clergy person assigned to guide the CLM, and a smaller group of 3-5 people in the local church referred to as a "Mutual Ministry Team." Together these people form the support necessary for the CLM to be effective in ministry. They are partners in ministry.

The mutual ministry team during the training phase will accompany the CLM on this journey by reviewing learning either by module review or reviewing course descriptions and goals from other venues. The team will provide input to the CLM Mentor and the CLM on the progress it sees and will provide feedback on areas that may need further development. This team is able to provide real time feedback and input on effectiveness since it is a part of the congregation.

The mutual ministry team in the place of assignment develops the ministry covenant together to assure that there is a clear understanding of the expectations of the CLM and other members of the mutual ministry team.

The content of the ministry covenant captures the important details and basics that guide the ministry in that place. It covers areas such as:

*  A short mission statement or description of the congregation and the purpose or role of the CLM,

*  The congregation’s ministry plan,

*  The financial responsibilities to the CLM,

*  Ministry assessment and evaluation.

It is important to note that the covenant guides the ministry of the church, not just those in ministry!

District Committee on Ministry’s Role

The District Committee on Ministry is the group given responsibility for interviewing and recommending certification of a lay minister. It is the committee's responsibility to see that:

*  It understands Certified Lay Ministry and its distinct relational ministry in the church. The dCOM must understand that it does not approve a ministry candidate in the traditional sense or ensure that the CLM knows everything about ministry before certification. Instead, the dCOM is a monitoring group to support the formation and accountability of the CLM.

*  An interview is scheduled with the CLM (and the CLM Mentor, if possible) to discuss call to ministry, completing coursework, and to recommend additional formation. Following the interview, the dCOM recommends or does not recommend to the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries certification of the lay minister.

* In addition, the district committee on ministry has the responsibility to report annually to the annual conference through the annual conference board of ordained ministry a roster of all persons certified as lay ministers.

Conference Role

Conference leaders can either build or block the effectiveness of a CLM. It is crucial that the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries work together with the Board of Laity and the Board of Ordained Ministry to provide consistent criteria for formation and use of certified lay ministry. These groups should meet and have conversations around these issues regularly. They may also plan recognition's and provide ministry interpretations so that individuals hear and respond faithfully to God's call to ministry.

Role of Conference Boards: Board of Ordained Ministry and Board of Laity

These groups have a vital supportive role in the training and recognition of CLMs by collaborating in developing a conference policy and practice. They are responsible for support, not certification.

The conference board of ordained ministry has the responsibility to report annually to the annual conference for publication in the conference journal a roster of all persons certified as Lay Ministers.

Role of the District Superintendent

The district superintendent has the responsibility for assigning a CLM to a place of service. A D.S. works with a local congregation to discern appropriate leadership that makes it possible for a CLM to serve where assigned. A district superintendent also assures that a supervising clergy person/mentor is appointed that ministry to support the CLM in his/her ministry as well as to provide for the sacramental ministry of the local congregation, if applicable. If another supervising clergy person/mentor is not available, the D.S. fills that role him/herself. (2016 BOD, par. 205.4)

Role of Conference Coordinator/Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries

Each conference will be encouraged to have a "conference coordinator" who works together with the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries to ensure:

*  Quality training/formation is provided

*  Process is followed

*  Appropriate background checks/psychological assessments/boundaries training are completed

*  Covenant is supported

*  CLMs are recognized and used

*  Team approach is valued




Certified Lay Ministry Accountability

A major component to the formation of Certified Lay Ministers is that of accountability. CLMs are accountable to the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries for overall oversight, to the district superintendent and/or supervising clergy person for service, to the District Committee on Ministry forinterview and recommendation of certification, and to the supervisory group within the ministry setting who will conduct a ministry review. You can download the pdf version from Discipleship Ministries .

Ministry Review

In order to renew recognition as a certified lay minister, the CLM must obtain a ministry review by the committee on pastor-parish relations, church council, or charge conference from the congregation of which he or she is a member, or when under assignment, from the committee on pastor-parish relations, charge conference, or supervisory board of the ministry setting in which he or she is assigned. (2016 BOD, par.268.4.b)

A CLM is foundationally a Certified Lay Servant and should submit an annual report to his/her church or charge conference. Annual report forms for Certified Lay Ministers are available at: https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/resources/lay-servant-ministries-forms.

The Mutual Ministry Team should also annually to review the Ministry Covenant. Both the Ministry Review and the Ministry Covenant should be submitted with the church’s Annual Charge Conference materials with a copy to the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries (or its equivalent). The ministry review will be used by the District Committee on Ministry for interview and recommendation purposes towards re-certification.

Suggestions for Ministerial Review/Evaluation

1. Because the ministry of the CLM is understood as a shared ministry within a ministry team, both the CLM and the congregation will be reviewed annually for ministry accomplishments.

2. The review of the congregation’s ministry should determine what is going well, what needs improvement, and what new goals and directions are emerging in the congregation, as well as how the CLM, church leaders, and congregation can continue to grow together in mutual ministry.

3. The review of ministries is inclusive of: 1) the CLM, 2) lay leaders, 3) committees, and 4) the congregation, as it ministers to members and the larger community. Ministry is and must be mutual.Therefore, no individual's performance in ministry can be reviewed with fairness apart from the whole. This does not, however, exclude the individual personnel reviews of ministry staff done by the Council.

4. Evaluation will be done by the congregation’s members and friends who identify themselves and should not be done anonymously.

5. The review process by the congregation should not to be tied to compensation issues.

6. Feedback from the review/evaluation should be given to the congregational members.1. Because the ministry of the CLM is understood as a shared ministry within a ministry team, both the CLM and the congregation will be reviewed annually for ministry accomplishments.

dCOM Interviews

A certified lay minister, after he/she has applied in writing and had all requirements for certification or re-certification reviewed by the conference committee on Lay Servant Ministries, or equivalent structure, is referred to the district committee on ordained ministry for examination (interview) and recommendation for both certification and re-certification.

Suggested Guidelines For the District Committee on Ministry (dCOM)

1. Please remember CLMs are important to the ministry of The United Methodist Church. CLMs most often serve small membership churches or on staff at a larger membership churches as part of a ministry team. Many CLMs have family responsibilities and full-time jobs which limit the amount of time they have to work on committees, for study and to attend district/conference meetings.

2. Most CLMs have not had formal theological training. They have felt God’s call to ministry and need our patience, support and guidance as they explore this call.

3. The dCOMs have an important role to play with CLMs in interviewing and recommending for certification. They are charged with interviewing a candidate to help them in the discernment process and to determine fitness and potential for ministry. The CLM program will train CLMs for service in ministry and the District Superintendent assigns CLMs to a specific ministry once they are approved for certification by the Conference Committee on Lay Servant Ministries (or equivalent).Interview committees should be looking at a candidate’s openness to grow, willingness to be part of the covenant, and for commitment to the doctrines of The United Methodist Church.

4. The Certified Lay Minister program has four training modules and specialization studies. A lay person can only be certified after completing all four modules or equivalent (and courses required for specialization, if required).

5. It is encouraged for CLMs to meet with the dCOM for introduction prior to completion of training.The CLM would then meet with the dCOM after training for purposes of interview and recommendation for certification. (Please check with your annual conference as to process required in that context.)

6. Background checks are encouraged for CLMs to serve in any kind of ministry in the local church. If a CLM is asked to serve a local church in a ministerial role as part of a ministry team, it is recommended that he/she complete psychological evaluation.

7. CLMs are required to complete a continuing education event every two years. Lay Servant Ministry advanced courses meet this requirement.

8. John Wesley and Francis Asbury believed that all pastors, both lay and clergy, should read and continue to grow and develop as spiritual leaders. The dCOM after meeting with a candidate might require the candidate to further study a particular area of ministry, perhaps working with a mentor or coach.

Suggested Questions for Candidates for Certified Lay Ministry

By Church Council or Charge:


It is recommended that Wesley’s historic questions be used by the church council or charge conference when considering someone for Certified Lay Ministry. These questions do not need to be asked but they should be part of the consideration process as the group reflects on the candidate:

1. Do they know God as a pardoning God? Have they the love of God abiding in them? Do they desire nothing but God? Are they holy in all manner of conversation?

2. Have they gifts, as well as evidence of God's grace, for the work? Have they a clear, sound understanding; a right judgment in the things of God; a just conception of salvation by faith?Do they speak justly, readily, clearly?

3. Have they fruit? Have any been truly convinced of sin and converted to God, and are believers edified by their service?As long as these marks occur in them, we believe they are called of God to serve. These we receive as sufficient proof that they are moved by the Holy Spirit. (2016 BOD ¶ 310.1.d.)

By District Committee on Ordained Ministry

Once a person has received the recommendations from his/her pastor and church council or charge conference and his/her district superintendent, has completed the required course work, and is appearing before the District Committee on Ordained Ministry for interview and recommendation of certification or re-certification as a CLM, it is recommended that Wesley’s historic questions be asked again as well as specific questions concerning the person's effectiveness in ministry. The following is a list of suggested questions and talking points to be used by dCOMs:

*  Tell us about your faith journey and your understanding of the Call of God upon your life.

*  How would you describe your understanding of God, Christ, and the work of the Holy Spirit?

*  How have you experienced the presence of God in your ministry?

*   Tell us about a leadership experience you have had in the local church within the last year.

*  Share with us a conflict situation in which you have been involved and how you dealt with it.

*  Tell us how your service in your local church has demonstrated your appreciation of the history, doctrine, polity, worship and liturgy of The United Methodist Church.

*  What gifts, skills, and abilities do you bring to certified lay ministry?

*  Describe the covenant you have developed with your Mutual Ministry Team.

*  Are you doing for personal spiritual growth?

*  What are you doing to take care of yourself physically?


TN CLM Registrar

Shana Hibdon
Turner Center at Martin Methodist

Address
433 West Madison Street
Pulaski, TN 38478Address

Phone
931-424-7347

Email
shibdon@martinmethodist.edu

lay servant ministries

Jackie Elliott
TN Conference Director

Address
PO Box 11
Smartt, TN 37378

Phone
931-668-7352

Email
jackieelliott4@gmail.com